THE AGE OF JACKSON

(1824-1844)

THE TERMS

“American System”

caucus

“common man”

“concurrent majority”

cronyism

egalitarian

electorate

factionalism

franchise

“hard money”

interstate commerce

“King Andrew I”

“Kitchen Cabinet”

Locofocos

“log cabinism” “mudslinging”

nullification

party conventions

patronage

“penny press”

“perpetual union”

“pet banks”

“preemption”

secession

“soft money”

specie

“spoils system”

states’ rights

“subtreasury”

veto

Whigs

THE FOLKS

John Quincy Adams

Nicholas Biddle

Black Hawk

Floride Calhoun

John C. Calhoun

Henry Clay

William Crawford

Thomas Dorr

John Eaton

Peggy O’Neale Eaton

William Henry Harrison

Robert Hayne

Andrew Jackson

Rachel Jackson

John Marshall

William Morgan

Osceola

Roger Taney

Alexis de Tocqueville

John Tyler

Martin Van Buren

Daniel Webster

THE ISSUES

The Election of 1824:

    The Expansion of the Electorate

    The Candidates

    The Election(s)

    The 12th Amendment

    The “Corrupt Bargain”

The “Tariff of Abominations”

The Dorr Rebellion

Tocqueville’s Democracy in America

The Election of 1828

Jacksonian Democracy:

    The Party System

    The Strengthened Chief Executive

    The Changing Emphasis Towards States’ Rights

    Party Philosophies

John C. Calhoun & Nullification (1828)

South Carolina Exposition & Protest

The Eaton Affair

The Webster-Hayne Debate

The Second Nullification Crisis (1832)

Jacksonian Indian Policy

Maysville Road Veto

The War on the Bank

The Election of 1932

Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge (1837)

Return of the Two-Party System

The Freemasons & Anti-Masonry

The Election of 1836

The Panic of 1837

The Election of 1840

John Tyler & the Whigs

The Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1842)